The Data Detective and How to Make the World Add Up

“He’s a genius at telling stories that illuminate our world”

Malcolm Gladwell

The Sunday Times number One Business Bestseller

How to Make the World Add Up

Ten Rules for Thinking Differently About Numbers

Is Published in North America as

The Data Detective

Ten Easy Rules to Make Sense of Statistics

Best Selling Author

Tim Harford

Tim is an economist, journalist and broadcaster. He is author of “The Next Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy”, “Messy”, and the million-selling “The Undercover Economist”. Tim is a senior columnist at the Financial Times, and the presenter of Radio 4’s “More or Less”, the iTunes-topping series “Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy”, and the new podcast “Cautionary Tales”. Tim has spoken at TED, PopTech and the Sydney Opera House. He is an associate member of Nuffield College, Oxford and an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society. Tim was made an OBE for services to improving economic understanding in the New Year honours of 2019.

FAQ
Tim Harford

Books

The Next Fifty

The Next Fifty Things

“Endlessly insightful and full of surprises – exactly what you would expect from Tim Harford.”

Bill Bryson

Fifty Things

Fifty Things

“Packed with fascinating detail… Harford has an engagingly wry style and his book is a superb introduction to some of the most vital products of human ingenuity.”

The Sunday Times

Messy – How to be Creative and Resilient in a Tidy-minded World

Messy

“It’s a very very good book, full of wise counterintuitions and clever insights.”

Brian Eno

The Undercover Economist Strikes Back

The Undercover Economist Strikes Back

“Every Tim Harford book is cause for celebration. He makes the ‘dismal science’ seem like an awful lot of fun.”

Malcolm Gladwell

Adapt

Adapt

“In a world that craves certainty, Harford makes a compelling case for why we can’t have it. A brilliant and oddly empowering book.”

Dave Gorman

Dear Undercover Economist

Dear Undercover Economist

“The very best letters from the ‘Dear Economist’ columns from 2003-2008 in one handy book-sized package.”

The Logic of Life

The Logic of Life

“As lively as it is smart, charming, penetrating, and wise. If you are at all interested in knowing much more than you do about how the world works, you couldn’t ask for a better guide than Harford.”

Stephen J. Dubner

The Undercover Economist

The Undercover Economist

“This book should be required reading for every elected official, business leader, and university student.”

Steven D. Levitt

Articles

Does economics have a problem with women?

When Elinor Ostrom became the first woman to receive the Nobel memorial prize in economics, in 2009, she quipped: “I won’t be the last.” Although she has since been proved right, it was nonetheless astonishingly late in the day for such a landmark. Adding to the...

read more

Pinker, Von Neumann, and how to be decent

Various exciting books are now out, or imminent. Steven Pinker's "Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce" is just around the corner, and as you might expect it is erudite, entertaining, and packed full of ideas (some new to me and some not). I'm doing an event...

read more

Back to school

I hope you've had a wonderful summer - or winter, if you're reading this in the southern hemisphere, or in early 2022. I've held off posting lots of August updates but now I'm back, and with a lovely little review of The Next Fifty Things That Made The Modern Economy...

read more

Espionage, assassination, and the modern factory

Piedmont, in North West Italy, is celebrated for its fine wine. But when a young Englishman, John Lombe, travelled there in the early eighteenth century, he wasn’t going to savour a glass of Barolo. His purpose was industrial espionage. Lombe wished to figure out how...

read more

The stamp at the bottom of the pyramid

‘It should be remembered, that in few departments have important reforms been effected by those trained up in practical familiarity with their details. The men to detect blemishes and defects are among those who have not, by long familiarity, been made insensible to...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest