Marginalia

Curious books

I’ve written recently about how much I’ve been enjoying Soonish (UK) (US) by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith, a highly amusing exploration of the latest technologies from satellite launch vehicles to 3D printed houses to gene therapy to self-organising robot swarms.

But what else is out there to celebrate the curious?

I recommend Steven Johnson’s Wonderland: How Play Made The Modern World (UK) (US) – a history of technology and economics with a difference. Johnson covers music, fashion, sports and much else with a lovely light touch.

Caspar Henderson’s new book is A New Map Of Wonders (UK) (US– it’s an exploration of art, science, and the way we perceive the world around us. The book itself is a kind of cabinet of wonders, packed with surprises and delightful digressions.

Puzzle fans will have their minds blown – if you’ve not already encountered it – by Raymond Smullyan’s What Is The Name of This Book? (UK) (USBegins with some silly puzzles, moves to variants of the one-always-tells-the-truth, one-always-lies puzzle, and before you know it you’re in the middle of Godel’s incompleteness theorem.

Richard Feynman was often billed as a “curious character”, although I prefer his lectures to his autobiographical work. Try the astonishing QED (UK) (US). I remember trying to explain this one in the pub to my friends, aged 18.

Claude Shannon’s endless desire to play with things and ideas is explored in a solid new biography, A Mind At Play (UK) (USby Soni and Goodman.

Next on my list: Philip Ball’s Curiosity (UK) (USand Walter Isaacson’s Da Vinci (UK) (US), which has been getting good write-ups.

My UK publishers have a competition going on Twitter to win all seven of my books. Or you can purchase any of them here.

 

Free email updates

(You can unsubscribe at any time)

4th of December, 2017Marginalia • Comments off